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Consumer Product Safety

Canada Consumer Product Safety Act Quick Reference Guide

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Table of Contents

Introduction

The purpose of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act is to protect the public by addressing or preventing dangers to human health or safety that are posed by consumer products in Canada.

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies to suppliers of consumer products in Canada, including manufacturers, importers, distributors, advertisers and retailers. The Act, which replaces Part I and Schedule I of the Hazardous Products Act, recognizes that suppliers of consumer products have an essential role to play in addressing any dangers to human health or safety that may be posed by these products in today's global marketplace.

This is a guide to the key provisions of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act. The guide provides an overview of the legislation and is not intended to substitute for, supersede or limit the requirements under the legislation. In case of any discrepancy between this overview and the actual text of the legislation, the legislative text will prevail. In addition, other laws, whether federal, provincial or territorial, may also apply to the products that are covered by this law.

For more information, please see web links listed in Appendix D or contact a Health Canada Product Safety Office listed in Appendix E.

Does the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act apply to you?

You have responsibilities under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act if you:

  • manufacture a consumer product;
  • import a consumer product into Canada;
  • sell a consumer product;
  • advertise a consumer product;
  • test a consumer product; or
  • package or label a consumer product.

A consumer product under the Act is a product that may reasonably be expected to be obtained by an individual to be used for non-commercial purposes. Non-commercial purposes would include a broad range of purposes such as domestic, recreational and sports purposes. This definition includes the product itself, the product's components, parts or accessories and its packaging.

Under the Act, manufacturing a consumer product includes producing, formulating, repackaging, and preparing it. It also includes reconditioning the product for sale.

Selling a consumer product includes leasing the product or distributing the product to one or more persons even if there is no money or other consideration exchanged for the distribution.

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act does not apply to some products that would otherwise fall under the definition of a consumer product. Schedule 1 of the Act lists products to which the Act does not apply. Examples of these products are explosives, cosmetics, drugs, food, medical devices, and ammunition. All of these products are dealt with by other legislation. The Governor in Council has the authority to add to this exclusion list by regulation. For the full text of Schedule 1, see Appendix A.

The Act also does not apply to natural health products. Natural health products are regulated under their own regulatory framework, the Natural Health Products Regulations under the Food and Drugs Act.

The Act does apply to tobacco products but only in relation to their ignition propensity.

Prohibitions under the Act

Under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act there are several important prohibitions respecting consumer products. Contravening any of these prohibitions is an offence under the Act subject to criminal prosecution.

Prohibited products

You are not allowed to manufacture, import into Canada, advertise or sell a consumer product that is listed in Schedule 2 of the Act. Examples of these prohibited products are baby walkers and jequirity beans. The Governor in Council has authority to amend Schedule 2 by regulation. For the complete text of Schedule 2, see Appendix B.

Products that do not comply with the Regulations

You are not allowed to manufacture, import into Canada, advertise or sell a consumer product that does not comply with the requirements set out in the regulations. These requirements include safety and performance requirements. Such requirements exist, for example, for cribs, kettles, lighters, children's sleepwear, strollers, and children's jewellery. For a list of the regulations that set out requirements, see Appendix C.

If you manufacture, import into Canada, advertise or sell consumer products, you are responsible for being familiar with the applicable requirements set out in the regulations.

Products that are a danger to human health or safety

If you are a manufacturer or importer, you are not allowed to manufacture, import into Canada, advertise or sell a consumer product that is a "danger to human health or safety".

No one is allowed to advertise or sell a consumer product that they know is a danger to human health or safety.

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act defines the concept of "danger to human health or safety." Here are the key elements of that definition:

  • Hazards posed by a consumer product captured are those that are unreasonable;
  • Hazards can be existing or potential;
  • The hazards are posed in, or as a result of, the products' normal or foreseeable use; and
  • The hazard may reasonably be expected to have an acute or chronic adverse effect on health, either immediately or longer term, and includes death.

Products that have been recalled

It is considered responsible business practice to ensure that unsafe consumer products are removed from the marketplace in an effective and timely manner. As a result, Health Canada anticipates that most recalls will occur at the initiative of the responsible supplier who will voluntarily plan and implement the details of the recall.

The Minister of Health (Health Canada) has authority under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act to order a person who manufactures, imports into Canada or sells a consumer product for commercial purposes to recall the product if Health Canada believes on reasonable grounds that the product is a "danger to human health or safety". Health Canada also has the authority to carry out a recall order if a supplier fails to do so, at the supplier's expense.

If you are a manufacturer or importer, you are not allowed to manufacture, import into Canada, advertise or sell a consumer product that is the subject of a recall order or that has been voluntarily recalled because it is a danger to human health or safety.

No one is allowed to advertise or sell a consumer product that they know is the subject of a recall order or that has been voluntarily recalled because it is a danger to human health or safety.

Products that require corrective measures

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act specifies circumstances in which Health Canada may order a person who manufactures, imports into Canada, advertises or sells a consumer product to take corrective measures, such as stopping the manufacture of a product or modifying the product so that it complies with the Act and regulations. The purpose of this type of order would be to remedy a non-compliance with the Act or regulations or to address or prevent a danger to human health or safety. Health Canada also has the authority to carry out corrective measures if a supplier fails to do so, at the supplier's expense.

If you are a manufacturer or importer, you are not allowed to manufacture, import into Canada, advertise or sell a consumer product that is the subject of a corrective measure that has not been carried out.

No one is allowed to advertise or sell a consumer product that they know is the subject of a corrective measure that has not been carried out.

Products packaged or labelled with misleading claims

No one is allowed to package or label a consumer product in a manner that may reasonably be expected to create an erroneous impression regarding the fact that it is not a danger to human health or safety. For instance, it is prohibited to use packaging and labelling to create the impression that a product is safe when it is in fact a danger to human health or safety. This would include packaging or labelling that is false, misleading or deceptive with respect to the product's safety. For example, a product containing lead in such concentrations as to pose a danger to human health or safety should not have on its package or label a claim that it is lead-free.

No one is allowed to package or label a consumer product in a manner that is false, misleading or deceptive regarding its certification related to its safety or its compliance with a safety standard or the regulations. For example, it would be an offence under the Act to make a claim on a consumer product that Health Canada has certified the health or safety of the product when this is not the case (note that Health Canada is not a certifying authority for consumer products). Similarly, a baby crib may not have a claim on it that indicates that the crib meets Health Canada safety or performance requirements if this is not true.

No one is allowed to advertise or sell a consumer product that they know is advertised, packaged or labelled in the manner described above.

Providing false or misleading information

It is an offence under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act to knowingly provide false or misleading information to Health Canada in relation to a matter under the Act or the regulations.

Tests, Studies and Information

Health Canada may order anyone who manufactures or imports a consumer product into Canada for commercial purposes to:

  • conduct tests or studies on the product in order to obtain the information that Health Canada considers necessary to verify compliance or prevent non-compliance with the Act or the regulations;
  • compile any information that Health Canada considers necessary to verify compliance or prevent non-compliance with the Act or the regulations; and
  • provide Health Canada with the documents that contain that information and the results of the tests or studies.

Preparing and Maintaining Documents

Under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act, anyone who manufactures, imports, advertises, sells or tests a consumer product must prepare and maintain certain records. The intent of these requirements is to ensure that consumer products are able to be traced throughout the supply chain at all times for the purposes of reporting and recalls.

Retailers are required to prepare and maintain documents that indicate the name and address of the person from whom they obtained the product, location where they sold the product and the period during which they sold the product. This requirement would be in addition to any other document retention requirements under the regulations.

Anyone else who manufactures, imports, advertises, sells or tests a consumer product for commercial purposes must prepare and maintain documents that indicate the name and address of the person from whom they obtained the product or the person to whom they sold it, or both. This requirement would be in addition to any other document retention requirements under the regulations.

All required documents must be kept for at least six years unless the regulations specify another time period. The documents must be kept in a person's place of business in Canada unless the regulations specify another location. The intent of these requirements is to ensure that consumer products are able to be traced through the supply chain at all times for the purposes of timely mandatory incident reporting, effective product recalls, and inspections.

Health Canada may exempt a person from the requirement to keep documents in Canada if it is considered unnecessary or impractical for the person to do so. In those cases, Health Canada may impose terms and conditions in relation to that exemption.

Mandatory Incident Reporting

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act sets out reporting responsibilities in relation to potential health or safety concerns with consumer products. Reportable incidents submitted by companies will help serve as an early warning and detection of health or safety issues with the purpose of reducing the number of unsafe or potentially unsafe consumer products on the Canadian market.

Anyone who manufactures, imports, or sells a consumer product for commercial purposes must provide Health Canada with all information in their control regarding an "incident". It is expected that suppliers will undertake an evaluation to determine if the suspected incident meets the criteria to be reported to Health Canada. This determination may be undertaken prior to timelines commencing for the mandatory incident reports.

To determine whether an event is a reportable "incident" the supplier must determine, among other things, whether their product is related to the suspected incident and that it meets one of the criteria for an incident, which are:

  • an occurrence in Canada or elsewhere that resulted or may reasonably have been expected to result in an individual's death or in serious adverse effects on their health, including a serious injury;
  • a defect or characteristic that may reasonably be expected to result in an individual's death or in serious adverse effects on their health, including a serious injury;
  • incorrect or insufficient information on a label or in instructions, or the lack of label or instructions, that may reasonably be expected to result in an individual's death or in serious adverse effects on their health, including a serious injury; or
  • a recall or measure that is initiated for human health or safety reasons by any of these entities:
    • a foreign entity,
    • a provincial government,
    • a public body established under provincial legislation,
    • an aboriginal government,
    • an institution of any of the above entities.

If you are a manufacturer (or if the manufacturer carries on business outside Canada, the importer) of a product that is involved with a reportable incident in Canada, you are also required to submit to Health Canada a more detailed written report within ten days after the day on which you became aware of an incident unless Health Canada specifies a different timeframe.

This report must contain information:

  • about the incident,
  • about the product involved in the incident,
  • about any other product that they manufacture or import into Canada that to their knowledge could be involved in a similar incident, and
  • about any measures that they propose be taken with respect to the products.

Disclosure of Information

Personal information

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act authorizes Health Canada to disclose personal information to a person or government that carries out functions relating to the protection of human health or safety without the consent of the individual to whom the personal information relates if disclosure of that personal information is necessary to identify or address a serious danger to human health or safety.

Disclosure of personal information under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act does not affect the provisions of the Privacy Act, in other words, the Privacy Act continues to apply.

Confidential business information

Health Canada is authorized under the CCPSA to disclose confidential business information in relation to a consumer product without the consent of the person to whose business or affairs the information relates and without notifying that person beforehand in two circumstances:

  1. where the disclosure is to a person or government that carries out functions relating to the protection of human health or safety or the environment and that person to whom or government to which the information may be disclosed agrees in writing to maintain the confidentiality of the information and use it only for the purpose of carrying out those functions; and
  2. where the disclosure of the information is essential to address a serious and imminent danger to human health or safety or the environment and the disclosure of the information is essential to address the danger; however, in this scenario, Health Canada must notify the person to whose business or affairs the information relates by the next business day following the disclosure.

"Government" is a defined term under the Act. It means any of the following or their institutions:

  • the federal government;
  • a crown corporation named in Schedule III to the Financial Administration Act;
  • a provincial government or a public body established under provincial legislation;
  • an aboriginal government;
  • a government of a foreign state or of a subdivision of a foreign state; or
  • an international organization of states.

"Confidential business information" is also defined in the Act and means business information:

  • that is not publicly available;
  • in respect of which the person has taken measures that are reasonable in the circumstance to ensure that the information remains not publicly available; and
  • that has actual or potential economic value to the person or their competitors because it is not publicly available and its disclosure would result in a material financial loss to the person or a material financial gain to their competitors.

All three criteria must be met.

The disclosure of confidential business information under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act and the Access to Information Act are each governed by different legal frameworks. Therefore one cannot compare the manner in which the two may be disclosed, nor how they are dealt with in the respective Acts.

Disclosing information to the public

Health Canada has authority to disclose to the public information about a danger to human health or safety that a consumer product poses.

Inspection

Inspection powers under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act are aimed at verifying compliance and preventing non-compliance.

Health Canada inspectors carry out many duties under the CCPSA related to verifying compliance and preventing non-compliance. Inspectors' activities may include:

  • inspecting locations where regulated activities such as manufacturing, import and sale take place;
  • verifying that suppliers of consumer products are familiar with their responsibilities under the Act and the regulations;
  • working with suppliers to correct or remove from the market products that are non-compliant with the law;
  • verifying that required records are prepared and maintained.

For the purpose of verifying compliance or preventing non-compliance with the Act or the regulations, the inspector may at any reasonable time enter a place, including a conveyance, in which the inspector has reasonable grounds to believe that a consumer product is manufactured, imported, packaged, stored, advertised, sold, labelled, tested or transported, or a document relating to the administration of the Act or the regulations is located. This does not include a location where a consumer product is stored by an individual for their personal use.

An inspector may enter a person's home to conduct an inspection if activities that are regulated under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act in relation to a consumer product are believed on reasonable grounds to be taking place in the home. An inspector may only enter a person's home in these circumstances with the person's consent or under the authority of a warrant.

An inspector who is carrying out their functions and any person accompanying them may enter on or pass through or over private property.

An inspector carries a certificate attesting to his or her designation as an inspector and must, if requested to do so, show the certificate to the person in charge of the place.

For the purposes of verifying compliance or preventing non-compliance during an inspection, an inspector has the power to:

  • examine or test anything that is found in the place and take samples free of charge;
  • open a receptacle or package that is found in the place;
  • examine a document that is found in the place, make a copy of it or take an extract from it;
  • seize and detain an article or conveyance that is relevant to the inspection for any time that may be necessary;
  • order a person to move an article or conveyance, not to move it or to restrict its movement;
  • make use of a computer or other device to examine a document or have it reproduced and to remove the reproduced output;
  • make use of copying equipment and remove copies for examination;
  • take photographs and make recordings and sketches
  • order the owner or person in charge of the place or a person who manufactures, imports, packages, stores, advertises, sells, labels, tests or transports a consumer product at the place to establish their identity to the inspector's satisfaction or to stop or start the activity.

The owner or person in charge of the place that is being inspected and every person found in the place must give an inspector all reasonable assistance and provide the inspector with any information that they may reasonably require.

Orders for Recalls and Taking Corrective Measures

A consumer product may be recalled on a voluntary basis by a supplier or may be ordered to be recalled by Health Canada.

Health Canada is authorized under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act to order a recall of a consumer product or to order a person to take certain corrective measures. These two powers are aimed at promoting rapid response to safety problems with consumer products, particularly in situations where suppliers fail to take appropriate steps to address the problems on a voluntary basis.

Recall orders

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act authorizes Health Canada to order a recall of a consumer product if Health Canada believes on reasonable grounds that the product is a danger to human health or safety. A recall order would be addressed to a person who manufactures, imports or sells a product for commercial purposes.

Taking corrective measures

Health Canada may also order a person who manufactures, imports, advertises or sells a consumer product to take certain measures if:

  • the person does not comply with an order to carry out tests or studies and to provide follow-up information verifying the compliance of a product with the Act and the regulations;
  • the product is the subject of a recall order;
  • Health Canada believes on reasonable grounds that the product is the subject of a measure or recall undertaken voluntarily by the manufacturer or importer; or
  • Health Canada believes on reasonable grounds that there is a contravention of the Act or the regulations in relation to the product.

The measures could include:

  • stopping the manufacturing, importation, packaging, storing, advertising, selling, labelling, testing or transportation of the consumer product; and
  • any measure that Health Canada considers necessary to remedy non-compliance with the Act or the regulations, including any measure to address or prevent a danger to human health or safety.

Health Canada may carry out recalls or measures

If a person does not comply with a recall order or an order to take corrective measures within the time specified, Health Canada may carry out the recall or the corrective measure required at the person's expense.

Review of orders

A person who was ordered to recall a consumer product or to take another measure may request in writing to have the order reviewed. The request for review must specify the grounds for review and set out the evidence that supports those grounds. While the order is being reviewed, the original order continues to be valid unless a review officer decides otherwise. The review can result in the order being confirmed, amended, terminated or cancelled.

Compliance and Enforcement Options

Health Canada's objectives in enforcing the provisions of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act are to improve the health and safety of all Canadians and to support industry in their efforts to comply with the legislation. In meeting these objectives, Health Canada has a range of options for promoting compliance and preventing non-compliance.

When voluntary compliance works

Voluntary compliance is often the most efficient and effective approach for everyone - the public, industry and government.

Health Canada inspectors work to administer and enforce the CCPSA and the regulations. Inspectors will

  • inspect locations where regulated activities such as manufacturing, import and sale take place;
  • verify that suppliers of consumer products are familiar with their responsibilities under the Act and the regulations;
  • work with suppliers to correct or remove from the market products that are non-compliant with the law;
  • verify that required records are prepared and maintained.

When an issue arises in relation to a consumer product that requires action, a supplier may agree to voluntarily correct any non-compliant behaviour or correct a non-compliant aspect of a product, to dispose of a product or, if necessary, to recall a product.

When voluntary compliance doesn't work

In cases where an individual or company does not voluntarily bring a product into compliance under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act or in urgent cases, Health Canada may be authorized to:

  • order the person to take corrective measures or take the corrective measures;
  • order the person to carry out tests or studies to verify compliance;
  • order a recall of unsafe products from the market or carry out a recall order.

Administrative Monetary Penalties

If a person does not comply with an order to take corrective measures or to recall a consumer product, Health Canada may issue a notice of violation with an accompanying fine. The fines under an administrative monetary penalty scheme are generally lower than the fines imposed following criminal prosecution. Regulations made under the Act will distinguish between minor, serious or very serious violations and fix a penalty or a range of penalties for the violations. A person who has received a notice of violation has the option of paying the penalty, requesting to enter into a compliance agreement or requesting a review of the notice of violation or the penalty.

Health Canada may publish information about a violation for which an administrative monetary penalty has been imposed for the purpose of encouraging compliance.

Health Canada concluded regulatory consultations for the making of Administrative Monetary Penalties (AMP) Regulations under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act in the fall of 2010. The department is proceeding through the established regulatory process. Updates on the status of these regulations will be posted to the Health Canada website (Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA)).

When resorting to the courts becomes necessary

In the most severe of cases, Health Canada can resort to the courts by seeking criminal charges against a person who has contravened the Act or regulations.

A person convicted of an offence under the Act is liable to a fine or to imprisonment, or both. The severity of the penalty is dependant on the nature and the circumstances of the offence. Directors and officers of a corporation who participated in a commission of an offence may be charged. A conviction would result in a criminal record.

In imposing a sentence, a court is required to consider the harm or risk of harm caused by the commission of the offence and the vulnerability of individuals who use the consumer product.

Health Canada may publish information about any contravention of the Act or the regulations for the purpose of encouraging compliance.

Appendix A

Canada Consumer Product Safety Act: Schedule 1 - Products that are excluded from the application of the Act

Under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act certain products are expressly excluded from the application of the Act. These products are described in Schedule 1 of the Act as follows:

  1. Explosives within the meaning of section 2 of the Explosives Act.
  2. Cosmetics within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  3. Devices within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  4. Drugs within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  5. Food within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  6. Pest control products within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Pest Control Products Act.
  7. Vehicles within the meaning of section 2 of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act and a part of a vehicle that is integral to it - as it is assembled or altered before its sale to the first retail purchaser - including a part of a vehicle that replaces or alters such a part.
  8. Feeds within the meaning of section 2 of the Feeds Act.
  9. Fertilizers within the meaning of section 2 of the Fertilizers Act.
  10. Vessels within the meaning of section 2 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.
  11. Firearms within the meaning of section 2 of the Criminal Code.
  12. Ammunition within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.
  13. Cartridge magazines within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.
  14. Cross-bows within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.
  15. Prohibited devices within the meaning of paragraphs (a) to (d) of the definition "prohibited device" in subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.
  16. Plants within the meaning of section 3 of the Plant Protection Act, except for Jequirity beans (abrus precatorius).
  17. Seeds within the meaning of section 2 of the Seeds Act, except for Jequirity beans (abrus precatorius).
  18. Controlled substances within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.
  19. Aeronautical products within the meaning of subsection 3(1) of the Aeronautics Act.
  20. Animals within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Health of Animals Act.

In addition the Act applies to tobacco products but only in respect of their ignition propensity.

Appendix B

Canada Consumer Product Safety Act: Schedule 2 - Prohibited consumer products

Under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act, a person is prohibited from manufacturing, importing into Canada, advertising or selling a consumer product listed in Schedule 2 of the Act.

This is the list of products contained in Schedule 2:

  1. Jequirity beans (abrus precatorius) or any substance or article that is made from or that includes jequirity beans in whole or in part.
  2. Spectacle frames that, in whole or in part, are made of or contain cellulose nitrate.
  3. Baby walkers that are mounted on wheels or on any other device permitting movement of the walker and that have an enclosed area supporting the baby in a sitting or standing position so that their feet touch the floor, thereby enabling the horizontal movement of the walker.
  4. Products for babies, including teethers, pacifiers and baby bottle nipples, that are put in the mouth when used and that contain a filling that has in it a viable micro-organism.
  5. Structural devices that position feeding bottles to allow babies to feed themselves from the bottle while unattended.
  6. Disposable metal containers that contain a pressurizing fluid composed in whole or in part of vinyl chloride and that are designed to release pressurized contents by the use of a manually operated valve that forms an integral part of the container.
  7. Liquids that contain polychlorinated biphenyls for use in microscopy, including immersion oils but not including refractive index oils.
  8. Kites any part of which is made of uninsulated metal that is separated from adjacent conductive areas by a non-conductive area of less than 50 mm and that either
    • has a maximum linear dimension in excess of 150 mm, or
    • is plated or otherwise coated with a conductive film whose maximum linear dimension exceeds 150 mm.
  9. Kite strings made of a material that conducts electricity.
  10. Products made in whole or in part of textile fibres, intended for use as wearing apparel, that are treated with or contain tris (2,3 dibromopropyl) phosphate as a single substance or as part of a chemical compound.
  11. Any substance that is used to induce sneezing, whether or not called "sneezing powder", and that contains
    • 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine (4,4'-diamino-3,3'-dimethoxybiphenyl) or any of its salts;
    • a plant product derived from the genera Helleborus (hellebore), Veratrum album (white hellebore) or Quillaia (Panama Wood);
    • protoveratrine or veratrine; or
    • any isomer of nitrobenzaldehyde.
  12. Cutting oils and cutting fluids, that are for use in lubricating and cooling the cutting area in machining operations, and that contain more than 50 g/g of any nitrite, when monoetha-nolamine, diethanolamine or triethanolamine is also present.
  13. Urea formaldehyde-based thermal insulation, foamed in place, used to insulate buildings.
  14. Lawn darts with elongated tips.
  15. Polycarbonate baby bottles that contain 4,4'-isopropylidene-diphenol (bisphenol A).

Appendix C

Canada Consumer Product Safety Act: Safety or Performance Requirements

Under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act a person is prohibited from manufacturing, importing into Canada, advertising or selling a consumer product that does not comply with the requirements that are set out in the regulations made under the Act.

Here is a list of those regulations:

  • Asbestos Products Regulations
  • Candles Regulations
  • Carbonated Beverage Glass Containers Regulations
  • Carriages and Strollers Regulations
  • Children's Jewellery Regulations
  • Children's Sleepwear Regulations
  • Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations, 2001
  • Consumer Products Containing Lead (Contact with Mouth) Regulations
  • Corded Window Covering Products Regulations
  • Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Expansion Gates and Expandable Enclosures) Regulations
  • Face Protectors for Ice Hockey and Box Lacrosse Players Regulations
  • Glass Doors and Enclosures Regulations
  • Glazed Ceramics and Glassware Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Carpets) Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Cellulose Insulation) Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Charcoal) Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Infant Feeding Bottle Nipples) Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Kettles) Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Matches) Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Mattresses) Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Pacifiers) Regulations
  • Hazardous Products (Tents) Regulations
  • Ice Hockey Helmets Regulations
  • Lighters Regulations
  • Phthalates Regulations
  • Playpens Regulations
  • Residential Detectors Regulations
  • Restraint Systems and Booster Seats for Motor Vehicles Regulations
  • Science Education Kits Regulations
  • Surface Coating Materials Regulations
  • Textile Flammability Regulations
  • Toys Regulations

Appendix D

Important Web Links

Appendix E

Contact Information for Regional Offices
Regional Consumer Product Safety Offices Locations in the United States that these Offices Serve Other Continents that these Offices Serve
  • British Columbia
    Regional Product Safety Office
    Suite 400
    4595 Canada Way
    Burnaby, British Coloumbia
    V5G 1J9
    Phone: 604-666-5003
    Fax: 604-666-5988
    Bby.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Alaska
  • California
  • Hawaii
  • Nevada
  • Oregon
  • Washington
  • Asia

Alberta, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut

  • Edmonton
    Regional Product Safety Office
    c/o Suite 730, Canada Place
    9700 Jasper Avenue
    Edmonton, Alberta
    T5J 4C3
    Phone : 780-495-2626
    Fax: 780-495-2624
    Alberta.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Calgary
    Regional Product Safety Office
    Room 282, Harry Hays Building
    220 - 4 Avenue S.E.
    Calgary, Alberta
    T2G 4X3
    Phone: 403-292-4677
    Fax: 403-221-3422
    Alberta.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Idaho
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • New Jersey
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Wyoming
  • Africa
  • Australia
  • New Zealand
  • Saskatchewan
    Regional Product Safety Office
    Room 412
    101 - 22nd Street East
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
    S7K 0E1
    Phone: 306-975-4502
    Fax: 306-975-6040
    Sk.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Manitoba
    Regional Product Safety Office
    510 Lagimodiere Blvd.
    Winnipeg, Manitoba
    R2J 3Y1
    Phone: 204-983-5490
    Fax: 204-984-0461
    Mb.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Arkansas
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Louisiana
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Nebraska
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Oklahoma
  • South Dakota
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin
  • Central America
  • South America

Ontario

  • Toronto
    Regional Product Safety Office
    2301 Midland Avenue
    Toronto, Ontario
    M1P 4R7
    Phone: 416-973-1748
    Fax: 416-973-1746
    Tor.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Hamilton
    Regional Product Safety Office
    55 Bay St. N
    9th Floor
    Hamilton, Ontario
    L8R 3P7
    Phone: 905-572-2845
    Fax: 905-572-4581
    Tor.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
   

Quebec

  • Longueuil
    Regional Product Safety Office
    1001 St-Laurent West
    Longueuil, Quebec
    J4K 1C7
    Phone: 514-283-5488
    Fax: 450-928-4066
    Quebec.Prod@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Quebec
    Regional Product Safety Office
    901 Cap Diamant, Local 266-1
    Quebec, Quebec
    G1K 4K1
    Phone: 418-648-4327
    Fax: 418-649-6536
    Quebec.Prod@hc-sc.gc.ca
   

Atlantic Provinces

  • Halifax
    Regional Product Safety Office
    Suite 1625
    1505 Barrington Street
    Halifax, Nova Scotia
    B3J 3Y6
    Phone: 902-426-8300
    Fax: 902-426-6676
    Atlantic.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • New Brunswick
    Prince Edward Island
    Regional Product Safety Office
    10 Highfield Street, 1st Floor
    Moncton, New Brunswick
    E1C 9V5
    Phone: 506-851-4525
    Fax: 506-855-6568
    Atlantic.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Newfoundland
    Regional Product Safety Office
    10 Barters Hill, 3rd Floor
    St. John's, Newfoundland
    A1C 6M1
    Phone: 709-772-4430
    Fax: 709-772-5945
    Atlantic.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Alabama
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Kentucky
  • Maryland
  • Mississippi
  • North Carolina
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia
  • Europe
  • National Capital Region
    Consumer Product Safety Directorate
    123 Slater Street, MacDonald Building
    Address Locator: 3504D
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1A 0K9
    Telephone: (613) 952-1014
    Fax: (613) 941-4376
    Toll-free: 1-866-662-0666
    (Calls will be routed to the nearest Consumer Product Safety Office.)
    CPS-SPC@hc-sc.gc.ca

    Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA)