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Consumer Product Safety

Industry Guide to Second-hand Products (Including Children's Products)

2012
ISBN: 978-1-100-21545-7
Cat. No.: H128-1/08-539-1E-PDF

Help on accessing alternative formats, such as Portable Document Format (PDF), Microsoft Word and PowerPoint (PPT) files, can be obtained in the alternate format help section.

Table of contents

Introduction

This document provides information about the safety requirements that apply to consumer products, including used or second-hand products that are imported, advertised or sold in Canada.

This document may be updated from time to time. For the most recent version, consult Reports and Publications.

This document is an unofficial summary of, and general guidance respecting, the safety requirements for second-hand products. It is not intended to substitute for, supersede or limit the requirements under the applicable legislation. In case of any discrepancy between this document and the legislation, the legislation will prevail. For further information, contact one of the Health Canada Consumer Product Safety Offices listed at the end of this document.

Legislation

Canada Consumer Product Safety Act

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), which has replaced Part I and Schedule I to the Hazardous Products Act (HPA), addresses dangers to human health or safety posed by consumer products in Canada.

Any person who manufactures, imports, advertises, sells or tests a consumer product for commercial purposes must comply with all applicable requirements of the CCPSA and its regulations. For example, the Act sets out requirements for preparing and maintaining documents and for mandatory incident reporting (see below for further details). Regulations under the Act set out product-specific requirements, such as performance-based standards, test methods and labelling.

Schedule 1 of the CCPSA lists consumer products to which the CCPSA does not apply. Examples of these products are explosives, cosmetics, drugs, natural health products, food, medical devices and ammunition. These products are addressed by other legislation.

Health Canada's Consumer Product Safety Directorate works closely with partners and stakeholders in administering the CCPSA to help protect Canadians from product-related hazards and to promote the safe use of consumer products.

In addition to the product-specific requirements noted in this document, it is prohibited to manufacture, import, advertise or sell any consumer product that is a "danger to human health or safety" as defined in the CCPSA (see paragraphs 7(a) and 8(a)). 

Any person who manufactures, imports or sells a consumer product for commercial purposes must inform Health Canada and, if applicable, the person from whom they received the product, of any incidents related to the product (see section 14 of the CCPSA and Guidance on Mandatory Incident Reporting under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act - Section 14 Duties in the Event of an Incident).

Furthermore, the CCPSA requires any person who manufactures, imports, advertises, sells or tests a consumer product for commercial purposes to prepare and maintain certain documents. Good record keeping practices aid in the retrieval of information and help ensure that appropriate documents are available when required for supply chain analysis (see section 13 of the CCPSA and Guidance on Preparing and Maintaining Documents under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act - Section 13).

Compliance and enforcement actions taken by Health Canada, with respect to non-compliance with the requirements of the these pieces of legislation, may include, depending on the applicable legislation: seeking voluntary commitments to product correction by industry, negotiation with industry for the voluntary removal of these products from the market, seizure, referral for orders for recall or other measures, administrative monetary penalties and referral for prosecution.

Health Canada Inspectors monitor second-hand retail establishments for unsafe or non-compliant products and may work with establishments to voluntarily address the non-compliance where appropriate, or use step-wise enforcement actions as required.

Food and Drugs Act

The Food and Drugs Act applies to the sale, import, advertising, packaging and labelling of food, drugs, cosmetics and devices. 

The Food and Drugs Act provides the authority for the Cosmetic Regulations.

Radiation Emitting Devices Act

The Radiation Emitting Devices Act (REDA) applies to the sale, lease, import, advertising, packaging, and labelling of radiation emitting devices, including devices used for medical and industrial purposes and those used by consumers. The Act has a general safety requirement for radiation emitting devices, and sets safety performance standards for specific classes of radiation emitting devices.

Safety requirements for second-hand products

Dealers have the primary responsibility under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), the Food and Drugs Act and the Radiation Emitting Devices Act (REDA) with respect to the safety of consumer products, including second-hand products. The Consumer Product Safety Directorate administers the CCPSA and, as they relate to cosmetics, the Food and Drugs Act and Cosmetic Regulations. The Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate administers the REDA.

These laws do not distinguish between new and used products. Any person who imports, sells, distributes, or gives away products not complying with the current legislation is breaking the law in Canada.

All cosmetics sold in Canada must meet the requirements of the Food and Drugs Act, the Cosmetic Regulations, and all other applicable legislation.

The REDA covers such items as microwave ovens, UV facial lamps and personal tanning equipment. For second-hand radiation emitting devices to be sold, they must also meet current standards.

Section A of this booklet provides information on consumer products and cosmetics, while Section B provides information on radiation emitting devices.

General recommendations for selling second-hand products

Make sure a product is safe and complies with the applicable legislation. This includes homemade and modified products. If you are unsure, do not sell it and do not give it away. For any product that is to be thrown away, refer to your municipal regulations for proper disposal.

To help make sure that you only handle safe products:

  1. Know and follow the requirements for products that are regulated.
  2. Check to see if a product has been recalled (see "Information on product recalls").
  3. Check that all parts are present, in good condition and function properly.
  4. Make sure assembly, instructions for use or warning labels are provided.
  5. Check to make sure a product is sanitary and free from contamination.

Section A - Consumer products and cosmetics

The Consumer Product Safety Directorate of Health Canada administers legislation pertaining to the safety of many consumer products, including cosmetics. The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) defines "consumer product" as a "product, including its components, parts or accessories that may reasonably be expected to be obtained by an individual to be used for non-commercial purposes, including for domestic, recreational and sports purposes, and includes its packaging."

The Food and Drugs Act defines "cosmetic" as including "any substance or mixture of substances manufactured, sold or represented for use in cleansing, improving or altering the complexion, skin, hair or teeth and includes deodorants and perfumes." This definition includes cosmetics used by professional esthetic services, bulk institutional products, "handmade" cosmetics sold at craft sales or home-based businesses.

General prohibition of unreasonably hazardous products

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) includes prohibitions on the manufacture, import, advertising or sale of a consumer product that is a "danger to human health or safety." The CCPSA defines the concept of "danger to human health or safety" by the following key elements:

  • unreasonable hazards posed by a consumer product
  • hazards can be existing or potential
  • the hazards are posed in, or as a result of, the products' normal or foreseeable use
  • the hazard may reasonably be expected to cause death or an adverse health effect (including an injury), whether immediately or not, and includes exposure to a consumer product that may reasonably be expected to have a chronic adverse effect on health.

Banned products

In Canada it is illegal to manufacture, import, advertise or sell certain products such as:

  • Baby walkers

  • Lawn darts with elongated tips

A full list of banned products can be found in Schedule 2 to the Next link will take you to another Web site Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA).

Regulated products

In addition to the prohibited consumer products found on Schedule 2 of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), a number of regulations place requirements on suppliers of specific consumer products. Only items that meet the current regulatory requirements may be sold. Many regulations under the CCPSA and the Food and Drugs Act have specific requirements that labelling be in English and French.

Additionally, before selling a second-hand product, check with the manufacturer, importer or distributor of the product and the Health Canada recall website to see if it has been recalled and if the problem has been or can be corrected. If it has been recalled and the problem has not been corrected or cannot be corrected, do not sell the product. Destroy it so that it cannot be used by someone else, and dispose of it according to your municipal requirements.

The following is a partial list of currently regulated products under the CCPSA and the Food and Drugs Act which fall under the mandate of the Consumer Product Safety Directorate (CPSD). This is a summary of some of the requirements that must be met in order to manufacture, import, advertise or sell these products in Canada; you should confirm the specific requirements by consulting the applicable regulations and ensure that you comply before supplying a product.

Bassinets

Bassinets are products whose main function is to provide a sleeping space for a child, that includes sides to confine the child and that has a sleeping surface area that is less than or equal to 4 000 cm2 (620 in2).

  • The Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations set out several requirements for bassinets. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met. The following information must be permanently affixed to the bassinet, in English and French:
    • name and place of business in Canada of manufacturer or importer
    • model name or number
    • date of manufacture
    • warning statements about following assembly instructions, the size of the mattress, proper use of product and other statements specified in the Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations
  • The assembly instructions and parts list, in English and French, must be either permanently printed on the product or included in a pouch that is permanently attached to the bassinet.
  • Bassinets must have at least a side height of 230 mm as measured from the top of the mattress support in any position to the top of the lowest part of the side.
  • The bassinet must not rock or swing beyond a 20° angle from the vertical (this requirement aims to help prevent uncontrolled swinging).
  • The mattress supplied with the bassinet should be in good condition and must be no thicker than 3.8 cm (1 1/2 in) and of such a size that, when pushed firmly against the sides of the bassinet does not leave a gap of more than 3 cm (1 3/16 in) between the mattress and any part of the bassinet's sides.
  • The bassinet should be in good condition and comply with a number of construction and performance standards. For example, no broken, cracked or missing parts; wood should be smooth and free of splinters; the metal should be free of burrs and sharp edges; and there should be no loose nuts and bolts.

For complete information about the requirements for bassinets consult the Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations.

Car seats and booster seats

National Safety MarkThe Restraint Systems and Booster Seats for Motor Vehicles Regulations set out, for the purposes of the CCPSA, several requirements for car seats and booster seats. These Regulations in turn reference Transport Canada's Motor Vehicle Restraint Systems and Booster Seats Safety Regulations. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the above-noted regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

  • A company may apply the National Safety Mark on a car seat or booster seat on condition that the product conforms to all the applicable Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standards.
  • The product must have stitched onto it, indelibly moulded into or onto it, or indelibly printed on a label affixed to it in a permanent manner, the following, in English and French:
    1. name and address of manufacturer, importer or retailer
    2. model name and number
    3. date of manufacture
    4. statements for weight and height range of user
    5. characteristics of vehicles in which the product is not to be used
    6. warning statements
    7. installation diagrams
  • Image of a children's car seat indicating the position of a tether strap.The instructions, in English and French, for proper installation and use must be available at the time of sale.
  • All forward-facing car seats must have a tether strap. 
  • All car seats must have a functional restraint system (harness system).
  • The product should be in good condition. For example, there should be no cracks in the plastic, missing hardware or loose parts.
  • Never sell a car seat or booster seat if it has been in a vehicle at the time of a collision.
  • Car seats should not be sold if they are past the lifespan recommended by the manufacturer.

For complete information about the requirements for restraint systems and booster seats consult the Restraint Systems and Booster Seats for Motor Vehicles Regulations.

For further information on car seats, including recalls, contact Transport Canada at 1-800-333-0371 or visit their Next link will take you to another Web site Web site.

Carriages and strollers

The Carriages and Strollers Regulations set out several requirements for carriages and strollers. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

  • A label containing the following information must be permanently affixed to the product:
    • name and place of business of manufacturer or importer
    • model name or number
    • date of manufacture
    • warning statements, in English and French, about never leaving a child unattended, using the lap belt and using the parcel bag only as recommended by the manufacturer
  • The product must have instructions, in English and French, which are on the product or with the product.
  • The product must have a braking device in working order.
  • The wheels should be securely attached.
  • Every stroller must have a working 3-point harness (i.e., waist and crotch belt) to prevent the child from sliding downward.
  • Products that fold must have a latching device which locks automatically and prevents the product from folding by itself.
  • The product should be in good condition and have no loose parts which pose a choking hazard to a child.

For more complete information about the requirements for carriages and strollers consult the Carriages and Strollers Regulations.

Children's jewellery

The Children's Jewellery Regulations set out several requirements for children's jewellery. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

Lead is a soft, heavy metal which is often used to make inexpensive jewellery. Lead is very toxic. A child can suffer from lead poisoning if they suck, chew, or swallow jewellery containing lead.

  • Jewellery containing lead which has a protective or decorative coating is not safe, since children can easily chew off the coating.
  • Jewellery for children under 15 years of age must not contain more than 600 mg/kg of total lead, and not more than 90 mg/kg of migratable lead.
  • If you are not sure if a children's jewellery product contains lead, it is wiser not to offer it for sale.

For complete information about the requirements for children's jewellery consult the Children's Jewellery Regulations.

Children's sleepwear

The Children's Sleepwear Regulations set out several requirements for children's sleepwear. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

The requirements for children's sleepwear apply to those products up to a children's size 14X. Children's sleepwear must comply with the Regulations which include specific requirements concerning flammability.

  • Loose-fitting children's sleepwear includes night gowns, nightshirts, dressing gowns, bathrobes, house coats, robes, pyjamas, and baby doll pyjamas. Loose-fitting sleepwear made of 100% polyester, 100% nylon or polyester/nylon blends are more difficult to ignite and are more likely to comply, whereas loose-fitting children's sleepwear made from cotton, cotton blends or rayon ignite readily and burn rapidly and likely do not meet the flammability requirements.

    Only testing can ensure that a fabric complies with the Regulations.

  • Check the label to see what materials the product is made from to be sure. If there is no label, it may be better not to sell the product.

    Image of a children's night gown, dressing gown and loose pyjamas.

  • Tight-fitting children's sleepwear includes polo pyjamas and sleepers with tight cuffs at the end of sleeves and pants and fit close to the body. These styles are less likely to make contact with a fire source, are likely to burn more slowly and can be made from cotton or cotton blends.
  • Health Canada recommends that belts, ties or sashes on children's robes be stitched firmly to the centre back of these products. Young children are at risk of strangulation from any type of cord that can be detached from the clothing.

For complete information about the requirements for children's sleepwear consult the Children's Sleepwear Regulations.

Corded window coverings

Window blinds with cords that are cut short and separated from each other, a label, and a tie-down device for a verticle blinds shownThe Corded Window Covering Products Regulations set out several requirements for corded window coverings. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

Children can strangle on cords and bead chains of blinds and curtains. A looped cord can act as a noose and long pull cords can wrap around a child's neck.

Blinds or curtains with pull cords should not be sold unless they have tension devices attached to any looped pull cord:

  • Devices on the pull cords to stop the inner cords from being pulled out; and
  • Labels with instructions in English and French to keep pull cords out of the reach of children.

For complete information about the requirements for corded window coverings consult the Corded Window Coverings Products Regulations.

Cosmetics

It is not recommended to sell used, old, or damaged cosmetics as they may contain harmful bacteria that could cause skin rashes or lead to infections. Additionally, second-hand cosmetics may be missing required labelling information, such as ingredients, warnings and directions for safe use.

For complete information about the requirements for cosmetics consult the Cosmetic Regulations.

Cradles

Cradles are products whose main function is to provide a sleeping space for a child, that includes sides to confine the child and that has a sleeping surface area that is greater than 4 000 cm2 (620 in2), but less than or equal to 5 500 cm2 (852 in2).

The Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations set out several requirements for cradles. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

  • The following information must be permanently affixed to the cradle, in English and French:
    • name and place of business in Canada of manufacturer or importer
    • model name or number
    • date of manufacture
    • warning statements about following assembly instructions, the size of the mattress, proper use of product and other statements specified in the Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations
  • The assembly instructions and parts list, in English and French, must be either permanently printed on the product or included in a pouch that is permanently attached to the cradle. 
  • Cradles must have at least a side height of 230 mm (9 in) as measured from the top of the mattress support in any position to the top of the lowest part of the side.
  • The cradle must not rock or swing beyond a 20° angle from the vertical (this requirement aims to help prevent uncontrolled swinging).
  • Image of a cradle indicating the maximum rock or swing angle (20° ) from the vertical to prevent uncontrolled swinging.
    The gap between the slats must not be more than 6 cm (2 3/8 in).
  • The mattress supplied with the cradle should be in good condition and must be no thicker than 3.8 cm (1 1/2 in) and of such a size that, when pushed firmly against any side of the cradle does not leave a gap of more than 3 cm (1 3/16 in) between the mattress and any part of the cradle's sides.
  • The cradle should be in good condition, for example, with no broken, cracked, missing parts or any loose nuts and bolts. Exposed wood, plastic or similar material must be smooth and free of splits, cracks and other defects; exposed metal must be smooth and free of sharp edges, corners, points and projections.

For complete information about the requirements for cradles consult the Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations.

Cribs

Cribs are products whose main function is to provide a sleeping space for a child, that includes sides to confine the child and that has a sleeping surface area that is greater than 5 500 cm2 (852 in2).

It is illegal to advertise, import, sell or give away cribs that do not meet the current regulatory requirements. Cribs manufactured before September 1986 likely do not meet these requirements and should therefore not be used. Infants have been seriously injured or have died when placed in a crib made before this date. Also, cribs older than ten years are more likely to have broken, worn, loose or missing parts, and be missing warnings or instructions.

The Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations set out several requirements for cribs. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

  • The following information must be permanently affixed to the crib, in English and French:
    • name and place of business in Canada of manufacturer or importer
    • model name or number
    • date of manufacture
    • warning statements about following assembly instructions, the size of the mattress, proper use of product and other statements specified in the Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations
  • The assembly instructions and parts list, in English and French, must be either permanently printed on the product or included in a pouch that is permanently attached to the crib.
  • Cribs must have a side height of at least 230 mm (9 in) as measured from the top of the mattress support in the highest position to the top of the lowest part of the side; and a side height of at least 660 mm (26 in) as measured from the top of the mattress support in the lowest position to the top of the lowest part of the side.
  • Mattress support systems that are not allowed to be used in CanadaThe mattress support system must be solidly affixed to the frame of the crib. The height of the mattress support should not be adjustable without the aid of tools. (No S or Z shape hooks are allowed!)
  • The gap between the slats must not be more than 6 cm (2 3/8 in) and the slats must not turn, dislodge, deform or become damaged turn when twisted.
  • The mattress supplied with the crib should be in good condition and must be no thicker than 15 cm (6 in) and of such a size that, when pushed firmly against any side of the crib does not leave a gap of more than 3 cm (1 3/16 in) between the mattress and any part of the crib's sides.
  • Image of a crib indicating the 3 cm maximum gap between the mattress and any part of the crib's sides, when the mattress is pushed firmly against the sides of the crib.The crib should not have corner posts which extend more than 3 mm (1/8 in) above the highest side; with the exception of corner posts that extend more than 406 mm (16 in) above the highest side provided that a neck entrapment hazard is not created.
  • The crib should be well maintained, for example, with no broken, cracked, missing parts or any loose nuts and bolts. Exposed wood, plastic or similar material must be smooth and free of splits, cracks and other defects. Exposed metal must be smooth and free of sharp edges, corners, points and projections.

For complete information about the requirements for cribs consult the Cribs, Cradles and Bassinets Regulations.

Ice hockey helmets and face protectors

The Ice Hockey Helmet Regulations and Face Protectors for Ice Hockey and Box Lacrosse Players Regulations set out several requirements for ice hockey helmets and for face protectors for hockey and lacrosse, respectively. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

Ice hockey helmets must meet and be certified to the requirements of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) standard Z262.1. The number of the standard must appear on the helmet; an example of how the number may appear is found below.

  • Image of a Canadian Standards Association (CSA) certification label for an ice hockey helmet. The label indicates the CSA Standard Z262.1 that the helmet satisfies.Ice hockey helmets must also display the date of manufacture. Helmets more than five years old should not be bought or sold as the materials used in the helmet may break down with age.
  • The product should be in good condition, with no cracks, missing padding or hardware. Modifications, such as drilled holes, stickers or re-painting should not have been done.
  • Ice hockey helmets must have a chin strap.

Face protectors for ice hockey must meet CSA standard CAN 3-Z262.2-M78, but it is recommended that these products meet the requirements of the most current CSA-Z262.2 standard for face protectors for use in ice hockey. The face protector should be in good repair with no cracks or bent wires, and fastened securely to the helmet. If the face protector is sold separately, it must have hardware for proper installation and instructions on how to install.

  • Face protectors for ice hockey helmets must be marked with the CSA label and the CSA standard number CSA Z262.2, while the hockey helmet must have a CSA hockey helmet label showing CSA Z262.1.
  • For goaltender ice hockey helmets, where the ice hockey face protector is integrally mounted on the helmet, the face protector itself would not include the CSA label. The hockey helmet would require the CSA standard number CSA Z262.2 and would also require the CSA hockey helmet label showing CSA Z262.1.
  • If in doubt, check the list of Next link will take you to another Web site CSA certified products.

For complete information about the requirements for ice hockey helmets consult the Ice Hockey Helmet Regulations.

For complete information about the requirements for face protectors for ice hockey and box lacrosse consult the Face Protectors for Ice Hockey and Box Lacrosse Players Regulations.

Playpens

The Playpens Regulations set out several requirements for playpens. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

  • The following information must be indelibly printed on the playpen or otherwise permanently affixed to it, in English and French:
    • name and place of business of manufacturer or importer
    • model name or number
    • date of manufacture
    • the following statement:
       "This product complies with requirements of the Playpens Regulations (Canada) / Ce produit est conforme aux exigences du RŔglement sur les parcs pour enfants (Canada)"
  • English and French assembly instructions must accompany the product.
  • The playpen must not present any scissoring, shearing or pinching hazards. The joint at the top drop rail must be covered by a plastic pad or designed to eliminate shearing or pinching hazards.
  • The height of the sides, as measured from the floor to the top of the rail, must be 48 cm (18.9 in) or more.
  • The product must not have more than two wheels or casters or the ability to attach additional wheels or casters.
  • Playpen mesh must be small, similar to mosquito-type netting, to prevent buttons located near the head and neck on children's clothing from catching and leading to strangulation.
  • Cut metal tubing with ends accessible to the child must be covered by a cap that cannot be removed.
  • The threaded end of bolts accessible to the child must be covered with acorn nuts or other suitable device.
  • Straps, cords, etc. more than 18 cm (7 in) in length cannot be attached to the playpen as they create a strangulation hazard.
  • The playpen should be in good condition.
  • It is recommended that playpen accessories meet the most current requirements found in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard, ASTM F406 - Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Non-Full-Size Baby Cribs and Play Yards.

For complete information about the requirements for playpens consult the Playpens Regulations.

Safety gates and enclosures

The Hazardous Products (Expansion Gates and Expandable Enclosures) Regulations set out several requirements for safety gates and enclosures. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

  • The following information must be indelibly printed on or permanently affixed to the gate:
    • name and place of business in Canada of the manufacturer, importer or distributor
    • model name or number
    • date of manufacture
    • warning statements, in English and French, about the intended use, age limits and installation as specified in the Regulations
  • Image of an accordion-style baby gate showing dangerous areas which could lead to strangulation, such as the large V-shaped openings across the upper edge, as well as dangerous areas which could lead to strangulation or entrapment, such as large diamond-shaped openings in the vertical surface.English and French assembly and installation instructions must accompany the product.
  • Any V shaped openings along the upper edge of the gate must have a spacing of 38 mm (1 1/2 in) or less when installed as recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Openings in a gate must be small enough to prevent a child from placing their head through the holes.
  • Every exposed wooden, metal or plastic part must be smoothly finished and free of splinters, burrs, cracks and other defects.

For complete information about the requirements for expansion gates and expandable enclosures consult the Hazardous Products (Expansion Gates and Expandable Enclosures) Regulations.

Toy boxes

  • Toy boxes with lids are required to have adequate openings for ventilation in each of two or more adjacent sides to prevent the suffocation of a child who may become trapped inside. If there is a lid on the toy box, it should be lightweight and have good supporting hinges.
  • Plastic, rubber or similar air-tight storage bins that are large enough to enclose a child cannot be promoted for toy storage.

For complete information about the requirements for toys consult the Toys Regulations.

Toys

The Toys Regulations set out several requirements for toys. The following discusses some, but not all, of these requirements. You should therefore consult the Regulations to ensure that all the applicable requirements are met.

  • Toys for children under three years of age must not have small parts that pose a choking hazard. See the Regulations for the specific requirements.
  • Ensure that toys are in good repair. For example, there must be no sharp edges or points, no loose eyes or noses and no rough wooden edges. All fasteners such as nails, staples, bolts and screws must be securely attached.
  • Toys should not have any paint peeling from the product.

Toys sold in flexible film bags

  • Toys packaged in flexible film bags that have an opening of 35.6 cm (14 in) in circumference or larger, must be labelled with an English and French suffocation warning.

    "Plastic Bags Can Be Dangerous. to Avoid Danger of Suffocation, Keep This Bag Away from Babies and Children.

    Les sacs de plastique peuvent ŕtre dangereux. pour Úviter le danger de suffocation, ne laissez pas ce sac Ó la portÚe des bÚbÚs ni des enfants."

In addition, the bag must be made from film that is at least 0.019 mm thick, so thin bags such as drying cleaning bags cannot be used.

Toys that emit sound

  • Toys that are excessively loud - that is, that exceed 100 dB when measured at a distance that the toy would ordinarily be from the ear of the child who is using it - cannot be sold in Canada. If you have to yell to be heard above the sound of a toy, then it is likely too loud for a child and should not be sold.

Toys with magnets

  • Check toys for loose magnets before selling.
  • Small powerful magnets used in toys, figurines, science kits, board games and other household items may pose a hazard if the item itself is small enough to be swallowed or if the small magnet breaks away from the product and is swallowed. If a child swallows more than one magnet over a short period of time, the magnets can attract one another while travelling through the intestines. When this happens, the magnets can twist the intestines and create a blockage or they can tear through the intestinal walls. The results can be very serious and even fatal.

Products not subject to product-specific regulations

Bicycle and in-line skating helmets

These products are designed to protect against one major impact. It is not recommended to resell these items.

Bunk beds

  • The top bunk should have guardrails on all sides of the bed.
  • The ladder should be in good condition and securely attached to the bed.
  • Corner posts or tops of the ladder uprights should not extend more than 5 mm (0.2 inches) higher than the adjacent surface, such as guard rails or end panels, to prevent snagging of clothes.
  • Check to make sure that the frame of the bed is solid.
  • Check the welds on metal bunk beds where the bed frame is fixed to the structure. Metal bunk beds with weld cracks should not be sold.
  • The mattress should fit snugly on all sides and its sleeping surface should be at least 127 mm (5 in) below the top of the guardrails and end panels.
  • Check for a label that indicates that the bunk bed meets the requirements of the current American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard, ASTM F1427 - Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Bunk Beds.

Image of metal bunk bed indicating locations where welds should be checked to determine whether the bed frame is fixed to the structure.

Drawstrings on children's clothing

Drawstring on waist of clothing getting caught on a school bus

All drawstrings should be removed from children's clothing. Drawstrings or cords on children's snowsuits, jackets and sweatshirts can become caught on playground equipment, fences or other objects and result in strangulation. If a drawstring is caught on a vehicle, the child can be dragged.

 
 
 

High chairs

  • It is recommended that a label containing the following information be permanently affixed to the product:
    • name and address of manufacturer
    • model name or number
    • date of manufacture
  • A chair should be stable and have a wide base to reduce the risk of tipping.
  • There should be a restraint system that consists of a strap which fits between the child's legs and a waist belt that is easy to fasten. The restraint system should be in good condition.
  • Verify that all latching and locking mechanisms found on the product are in good working order.
  • Exposed wooden or plastic parts should be smoothly finished and free from splits, cracks or other defects.
  • Product should be in good condition and have no loose parts which pose a choking hazard to a child.

Check for a label that indicates that the high chair meets the requirements of the current ASTM F404 - Standard Consumer Safety Specification for High Chairs.

Infant bath seats and bath rings

  • People may believe that these products are safety devices and that the product will keep an unsupervised baby safe in the tub. However, this is not the case since many babies have died when they were left alone in a bath seat or bath ring, even for seconds.
  • Reselling infant bath seats or bath rings can be especially dangerous because any warnings or instructions that could have alerted a caregiver of the serious drowning hazard related to these products may be out of date or missing entirely. Further, it is not recommended to resell these products because the suction cups or other means to attach them to a tub can be ineffective.

    Three types of infant bath seats: seat with suction cups, ring with suction cups, and seat with an arm that attaches to the side of the bathtub

Portable bed rails

  • Bed rails are used on standard beds to keep children from falling out of the bed. Children who are younger than the manufacturer's recommendations can suffocate between the bed rail and the mattress.
  • Used bed rails should not be sold if they are damaged or if they are missing safety labels that state the recommended ages.
  • Check for a label that indicates that the portable bed rails meet the requirements of the current ASTM F2085 - Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Portable Bed Rails.

Ski and snowboard helmets

  • The helmet should be of the correct size for the user and must have a chin strap. It should cover the user's forehead and it should feel snug and comfortable with room for only one finger width under the chinstrap.
  • Helmets should be in good condition, with no cracks and no missing padding or hardware. There should be no modifications, such as drilled holes, stickers or re-painting.
  • There are various voluntary safety standards for ski or snowboard helmets including EN 1077, ASTM F2040, Snell RS 98 and CSA Z263.1. Should a helmet meet one of these safety standards, a mark or label identifying the standards it meets should be visible on the helmet.
  • It is recommended to only re-sell helmets that meet one of the above listed safety standards.
  • Most ski and snowboard helmets are designed to protect against one major impact. Never re-sell a helmet if it has been involved in a major impact or is over five years old, either of which may degrade the protection offered by the helmet.
  • Never sell a second-hand helmet if you are unsure of its history or if it appears damaged.

Information on product recalls

For second-hand retailers, it is very important to check that the consumer products you receive have not been recalled, as children have been injured and have died using recalled products. Also, when recalled products have been repaired with retrofit kits, or other means offered by the manufacturer, make sure the product has been corrected properly as directed by the manufacturer.

To learn if a consumer product has been recalled in Canada, check with the following:

Recalls from the United States regarding consumer products from the Next link will take you to another Web site Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) are available on: www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prerel.html

Subscribe to Consumer Product Safety News, the Consumer Product Safety Directorate's electronic newsletter. Subscribers receive updates when new information, consumer advisories and warnings, recalls and consultation documents regarding consumer product safety are posted on the Health Canada website.

Information resources

NOTICE: For further information, contact a Health Canada Consumer Product Safety Office (refer to the list at the end of this document) or visit the following:

Contact information - Health Canada Consumer Product Safety Offices

To reach the Regional Product Safety Office nearest you see the information below or call toll-free (within Canada and the United States) at 1-866-662-0666.

Health Canada Consumer Product Safety Offices
Regional Consumer Product Safety Offices
Locations in the United States that these offices serve
Other continents that these offices serve

British Columbia
Regional Product Safety Office
Suite 400
4595 Canada Way
Burnaby, British Columbia
V5G 1J9
Phone: 604-666-5003
Fax: 604-666-5988
Bby.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca

Alaska
California
Hawaii
Nevada
Oregon
Washington
Asia
Alberta, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut

Edmonton
Regional Product Safety Office
c/o Suite 730, Canada Place
9700 Jasper Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta
T5J 4C3
Phone : 780-495-2626
Fax: 780-495-2624
Alberta.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca

Calgary
Regional Product Safety Office
Suite 674, Harry Hays Building
220 - 4th Avenue South East
Calgary, Alberta
T2G 4X3
Phone: 403-292-4677
Fax: 403-221-3422
Alberta.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca

Arizona
Colorado
Connecticut
Idaho
Maine
Massachusetts
Montana
New Hampshire
New Mexico
New Jersey
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
Utah
Vermont
Wyoming
Africa
Australia
New Zealand
Pacific Islands
Saskatchewan
Regional Product Safety Office
Room 412
101 - 22nd Street East
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
S7K 0E1
Phone: 306-975-4502
Fax: 306-975-6040
MBSK.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca

Manitoba
Regional Product Safety Office
510 Lagimodiere Boulevard
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R2J 3Y1
Phone: 204-983-5490
Fax: 204-984-0461
MBSK.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca

Arkansas
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Louisiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
New York
North Dakota
Oklahoma
South Dakota
Texas
Wisconsin
Central America
Bermuda
Caribbean
South America

South America

Ontario

Toronto
Regional Product Safety Office
2301 Midland Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M1P 4R7
Phone: 416-973-1748
Fax: 416-973-1746
Tor.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca

Hamilton
Regional Product Safety Office
55 Bay Street North, 9th Floor
9th Floor
Hamilton, Ontario
L8R 3P7
Phone: 905-572-2845
Fax: 905-572-4581
Tor.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca

   
Quebec

Longueuil
Regional Product Safety Office
1001 St-Laurent Street West
Longueuil, Quebec
J4K 1C7
Phone: 514-283-5488
Fax: 450-928-4066
Quebec.Prod@hc-sc.gc.ca

Quebec
Regional Product Safety Office
902-1550 D'Estimauville Avenue
Quebec, Quebec
G1J 0C5
Phone: 418-648-4327
Fax: 418-649-6160
Quebec.Prod@hc-sc.gc.ca

   
Atlantic Provinces

New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island

Regional Product Safety Office
Suite 1625, 1505 Barrington Street
Halifax, Nova Scotia
B3J 3Y6
Phone: 902-426-8300
Fax:      902-426-6676
Atlantic.Prodsafe@hc-sc.gc.ca

Alabama
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Maryland
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee
Virginia
West Virginia
Europe

National Capital Region
Consumer Product Safety Directorate
269 Laurier Avenue West
A.L.: 4909A
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0K9

   

Section B - Products under the Radiation Emitting Devices Act

The Radiation Emitting Devices Act (REDA) applies to the sale, lease, import, advertising, packaging and labelling of radiation emitting devices, including devices used for medical and industrial purposes and those used by consumers. Motor vehicles and radiation emitting devices designed primarily for the production of nuclear energy (within the meaning of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act) are excluded from the Act.The Act has a general safety requirement for radiation emitting devices, and sets safety performance standards for specific classes of radiation emitting devices in order to help reduce the risks to workers and the public from radiation.

Manufacturers and importers are required to notify the Minister of Health if a device does not comply with the general safety requirement or with the requirements specified in the regulations.

The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations prescribe safety performance standards and labelling requirements that address the design, construction, and functioning of certain classes of radiation emitting devices. All radiation emitting devices must meet the generally applicable provisions of the Act, regardless of whether or not they are subject to specific regulations. The text of the Act and Regulations can be found on the website of the Department of Justice Canada.

A copy of the Next link will take you to another Web site REDA can be viewed at: www.laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/R-1/index.html to verify if a product is adequate for sale.

Products of interest

It is the responsibility of the manufacturer, importer, distributor and retailer of the product to make sure it complies with the Radiation Emitting Devices Act (REDA).

Lasers

If you plan to resell a piece of laser equipment:

  • ensure the equipment is provided with its parts as recommended by the original manufacturer and in good working order
  • the product should include instructions for user
  • the product should have original labels affixed on it
  • ensure that sale of the product does not violate the general prohibition described above

You should contact the original manufacturer or the distributor to verify if a product is adequate for sale.

For a copy of the 2011 Health Canada Advisory on Hand-Held Lasers or Laser Pointers visit: http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/recall-alert-rappel-avis/hc-sc/2012/15008a-eng.php

Microwave ovens

If you plan to resell a microwave oven:

  • ensure the microwave oven is in good working order
  • English and French instructions for use should accompany the microwave oven
  • If there is any noticeable damage to the door or door hinges, there may be excessive microwave leakage. If this is the case, contact the manufacturer, distributor, or a qualified service technician to have the oven professionally inspected before selling.

For more information about microwave ovens visit: www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/iyh-vsv/prod/micro-f-a-eng.php

Personal stereo systems

If you plan to resell a personal stereo system:

  • ensure that instructions for safe use are available with the device
  • there should be a functioning volume control that enables sound levels to be listened to safely without risk of hearing damage and to ensure that you can still hear the sounds around you for safety

For more information about personal stereo systems visit: www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/iyh-vsv/life-vie/stereo-baladeur-eng.php

Tanning equipment

If you plan to resell any tanning equipment (for example, sunlamps, tanning beds, tanning canopies, upright tanning booths and facial or half-body tanning lamps), you are responsible for ensuring product compliance with all aspects of the Tanning Equipment standard (see Part XI of Schedule II of the Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations), including information and labelling requirements, construction standards (for example, safety features, components and accessories) and functioning standards.

  • Ensure the ultraviolet lamps are equivalent to the original lamps as recommended by the original manufacturer and meet the labelling, construction and functioning requirements.
  • English and French instructions, warnings and protective eyewear must accompany the product at the time of sale, lease or importation.
  • English and French information labels must be permanently affixed to the device and readily accessible to view by the user.
  • English and French coloured warning labels must be downloaded from Health Canada's website and affixed on the product before the device can be sold, leased or imported.

You should contact the original manufacturer or the distributor to verify compliance before the sale of the product. Screw lamp holder types are illegal for sale.

Contact information - Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau

Mail:
Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau
Health Canada
775 Brookfield Road
A.L. 6302C
Ottawa, Ontario  K1A 1C1

Email:
ccrpb-pcrpcc@hc-sc.gc.ca