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Food and Nutrition

Ready-to-Use Presentation for Nutrition Educators on
Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis

Below you will find a ready-to-use presentation with information on:

  • A walking tour of Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis;
  • How this food guide was created;
  • What makes it special; and
  • Where to find more information about Canada's Food Guides.

This presentation has been developed for all educators involved in promoting healthy eating. These educators include:

  • Community health workers and community health representatives;
  • Dietitians and nutritionists; and
  • Nurses (such as those working in public and community health).

Using the Presentation:

When you open the presentation, a box named 'Password' will appear. Choose the 'Read Only' option in the bottom right corner. You may:

  • View the presentation;
  • Use a projector to show it to a group of people;
  • Print the presentation on transparencies to use with an overhead projector; or
  • Print the presentation on regular paper as handouts for participant.

Speaker's Notes are provided to help someone talk about each slide in the presentation. The speaker's notes can be seen by choosing either the 'Normal', or 'Notes Page' options from the top 'View' menu item.

Help on accessing alternative formats, such as Portable Document Format (PDF), Microsoft Word and PowerPoint (PPT) files, can be obtained in the alternate format help section.

Presentation Slides

  1. Introducing Canada's Food Guide
  2. What is inside this presentation?
  3. Why do we have a food guide?
  4. Why eat healthy?
  5. Two National Food Guides
  6. How is this food guide different?
  7. How was this food guide developed?
  8. The Cover Design
  9. Amounts of food to choose
  10. What is a 'Food Guide Serving'?
  11. Counting 'Food Guide Servings'
  12. Type of foods to choose
  13. Choosing Vegetables and Fruit (dark green vegetables)
  14. Choosing Vegetables and Fruit (orange vegetables)
  15. Choosing Vegetables and Fruit (juice)
  16. Traditional foods in the Vegetables and Fruit group
  17. Choosing Grain Products
  18. Choosing Milk and Alternatives
  19. Other dairy products...
  20. Traditional food sources of the nutrients found in milk
  21. Choosing Meat and Alternatives
  22. Traditional foods in the Meat and Alternatives group
  23. When cooking or adding fat to food
  24. Making better choices...
  25. Respect your body
  26. Women of Childbearing Age
  27. Extra calories are needed during pregnancy and breastfeeding
  28. Women and men over the age of 50
  29. Being active every day
  30. For more information

Slide # 1

Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide
First Nations, Inuit and Métis

Introducing Canada's Food Guide

Slide # 1 - Speaker's Notes

What is "Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis"?

  • It is a food guide tailored to reflect the traditions and food choices of First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

  • It is a complement to the 2007 Canada's Food Guide, and has recommendations for healthy eating based on science.

  • It recognizes the importance of traditional and store-bought foods for First Nations, Inuit and Métis today.

  • It can be an important tool for individuals, families and communities to learn about and share ways of eating well, including traditional and store-bought foods.

Slide # 2

What is inside this presentation?

  • Why do we have a food guide?
  • How was this food guide developed?
  • A walking tour through the food guide
  • Where you can find more information about Canada's Food Guides

Slide # 2 - Speaker's Notes

  • This presentation is an introduction to the food guide, Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

  • We will start by speaking about food guides in general, then look at how this food guide was created and what makes it special.

  • We will then take a walking tour through Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis and finish by pointing out where more information can be found.

Slide # 3

Why do we have a food guide?

  • The food guide describes healthy eating for Canadians over the age of 2
  • It describes the amount and type of food to eat in a day
  • It emphasizes the importance of both healthy eating and physical activity

Slide # 3 - Speaker's Notes

  • The food guide is intended to help people 2 years of age and older to make food choices that promote health.

Slide # 4

Why eat healthy?

  • The food guide shows the amount and types of food needed:
    • for children and teens to grow and be healthy
    • for people to meet their nutrient needs
    • to promote health
    • to lower the risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, certain types of cancer and osteoporosis

Slide # 4 - Speaker's Notes

  • As we see from the information at the top right of the inside page of the food guide, eating the amount and type of foods recommended will help you meet your needs for vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients; reduce the risk of many diseases; and contribute to overall health and well-being.

  • The Food Guide is not a weight-loss diet, but it does promote a healthy pattern of eating that can help reduce the risk of being overweight or obese.

Don't people already know what to eat?

There are many factors all around us that influence the foods people choose to eat:

  • Stores and restaurants have a lot of foods to choose from
  • Busy schedules mean less time for grocery shopping, food preparation and eating
  • People are exposed to many different nutrition messages -- some are good, and some aren't (Canada's Food Guide is a trusted source of information about eating well)
  • Food is available to most people at most times of the day.

Slide # 5

Two National Food Guides

Canada's Food Guide Cover Page  Canada's Food Guide -First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cover Page

Slide # 5 - Speaker's Notes

In 2007, two national food guides were released:

  • Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide. An image of its cover is shown on the left.
  • Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. An image of its cover is shown on the right. This food guide is based on Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide.

  • Each of these two food guides is a tool to help Canadians make healthy food choices. Each is a guide to choosing healthy amounts and types of foods. Both food guides give recommendations for eating well based on science.

  • The rest of this presentation will provide information about the food guide pictured on the right, Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit, and Métis.


Slide # 6

How is this food guide different?

  • A circle is used instead of the rainbow for the cover design

  • It reflects the importance of food as a link to the land, to family and community, and as an element of spirituality

  • It shows traditional foods inside, as examples for Food Guide Servings

Slide # 6 - Speaker's Notes

This slide lists some of the key differences of the food guide Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

  • This food guide is two pages shorter than Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide, and focuses on the main messages of Canada's Food Guide.

  • The main design on the cover is a circle instead of a rainbow. A circular design is meaningful to many Aboriginal cultures, representing balance, cycles of life, and nature, etc.

  • This food guide reflects the importance of both traditional and store-bought foods for Aboriginal people.

  • The store-bought foods on this food guide are generally available in rural and remote locations, as well as in cities.

  • This food guide highlights the diversity of traditional foods across Canada, and shows examples of foods that are representative of traditional foods from across the country. This food guide is not intended to represent all of the food choices of First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

Slide # 7

How was this food guide developed?

  • The recommendations are based on science which tells us about the relationship between the food we eat and our health

  • Feedback was provided from health experts, an advisory group, and First Nations, Inuit and Métis people

Slide # 7 - Speaker's Notes

The science used to develop the recommendations of the food guide includes:

  • Knowledge about specific needs for vitamins, minerals, other nutrients such as protein, and energy (these are the Dietary Reference Intakes)
  • Information from major scientific reports on the relationship between foods and chronic diseases such as heart disease and stroke, and diabetes.

In addition to the science, the food guide was developed using input from people who use the food guide.

  • Over 400 First Nations, Inuit and Métis people, as well as nutrition educators and nutrition experts were consulted through phone interviews, an online survey, and focus groups.
  • A large number of nutrition educators reviewed the draft food guide. These nutrition educators included dietitians and nutritionists, public health nurses, community health workers and dental therapists. They all worked with Aboriginal people.
  • An advisory group helped with the development of this food guide by providing advice on the design and the content of the food guide.
  • These many consultations led to a food guide which reflected the comments and input of people who will use the food guide.

Slide # 8

The Cover Design

First Nations, Inuit and Métis food guide image

Slide # 8 - Speaker's Notes

  • The cover design shows traditional foods, and traditional food gathering activities as well as store bought foods.

The inner circle

The inner circle contains images of Aboriginal peoples harvesting and enjoying traditional foods. This imagery:

  • relays the cultural, spiritual, emotional and physical significance of traditional foods, demonstrating the link of food to land, culture and traditions, and family and community
  • shows traditional foods from the air, land and water
  • promotes physical activity
  • provides an opportunity for telling stories.

The outer circle

  • The outer circle shows store-bought foods that are typically available and affordable, in remote communities and cities.

Slide # 9

Recommended Number of Food Guide Servings per day

Recommended Number of Food Guide Servings per day

Amounts of food to choose

  1. Find your age and sex group in the chart

  2. Look down the column to the number of Food Guide Servings you need from each food group every day

Slide # 9 - Speaker's Notes

To use the food guide:

  1. First find your age and sex group at the top of the columns in the chart titled 'Recommended Number of Food Guide Servings per Day'.
  2. Next, look down the column for the number of Food Guide Servings you need every day from each of the food groups (Vegetables and Fruit, Grain Products, Milk and Alternatives, Meat and Alternatives).
  3. Finally look at the examples of the amounts of food shown as a 'Food Guide Serving' in the rows to the right of the chart.

This chart shows recommendations for the number of Food Guide Servings for each of the four food groups, for four age and sex groups. It is the start of a healthy eating pattern.

The four age and sex groups are:

  1. Children 2 to 3 years old
  2. Children 4 to 13 years old
  3. Female teens and adults
  4. Male teens and adults.

Slide # 10

What is a 'Food Guide Serving'?

  • A specific amount of food

  • The pictures of foods and the measuring cups are used to help show how much of each food counts as one Food Guide Serving

Slide # 10 - Speaker's Notes

  • A Food Guide Serving refers to a specific amount of food. The recommended number of Food Guide Servings for each age and sex group and the size of a Food Guide Serving provides a guideline for the recommended total amount of food from each food group per day.

  • The amount of food that we normally put on our plates or in our drinking glasses may be more (or less) than a Food Guide Serving. To count the number of Food Guide Servings on your plate you will need to compare the amount of each food on your plate to what is recommended in the food guide.

Slide # 11

Counting 'Food Guide Servings'

How many Food Guide Servings from each food group are you having in this meal?

  • 2 pieces of toast
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • 1 cup of milk
  • 2 poached eggs

Slide # 11 - Speaker's Notes

Example meal

  • For example, it is breakfast time and you have 2 pieces of toast, 1 cup orange juice, 1 cup of milk, and 2 poached eggs. How many Food Guide Servings of each food group are you eating?

Answers:

  • 2 pieces of toast = 2 Food Guide Servings of grain products (pay attention to the size of the bread)
  • 1 cup orange juice = 2 Food Guide Servings of vegetables and fruit
  • 1 cup of milk = 1 Food Guide Serving of milk and alternatives
  • 2 poached eggs = 1 Food Guide Serving of meat and alternatives

Slide # 12

Type of foods to choose

  • Some foods are more nutritious than others

  • Look at the bold print along the top of each food group bar for advice on making the best quality food choices
    • For example 'Make at least half of your grain products whole grain each day'

  • Within each food group choose the foods that are lower fat, sugar, and salt

Make at least half of your grain products whole grain each day. Choose grain products that are lower in fat, sugar or salt.

Slide # 12 - Speaker's Notes

  • In each food group, some foods are especially nutritious. These foods are noted in bold print at the top of each food group row.

  • The next few slides will take a closer look at these foods that are 'best choices' for nutrition.

Slide # 13

Choosing Vegetables and Fruit

  • Eat at least one serving of a dark green vegetable each day

  • Can you name some dark green vegetables?

  • Why choose dark green vegetables every day?
Dark green and orange vegetables 125 ml (1/2 cup)

Slide # 13 - Speaker's Notes

  • Ask someone to read the recommendations for choosing the most nutritious vegetables and fruit, which are in bold print along the top of the vegetable and fruit food group row.
  • Examples of dark green vegetables include asparagus, broccoli, brussels sprouts, green peas, romaine lettuce, and spinach.

  • Dark green vegetables are rich sources of folate.

  • Remember to choose vegetables and fruit prepared with little or no added fat, sugar or salt.

Slide # 14

Choosing Vegetables and Fruit

  • Eat at least one orange vegetable each day

  • Can you name some orange vegetables?

  • Why choose orange vegetables every day?

  • What about orange fruits?

Slide # 14 - Speaker's Notes

  • Examples of orange vegetables include: carrots, pumpkins, orange-coloured squash, and sweet potatoes.

  • Orange vegetables are rich in carotenoids (a type of nutrient), which the body changes into vitamin A.

  • Some orange fruit such as cantaloupe, mango, papaya and apricots are also important sources of carotenoids. People can eat them in place of an orange vegetable.

  • While oranges are a good source of nutrients such as folate and vitamin C, they are not a good source of carotenoids like the other orange vegetables and fruits previously mentioned.

Slide # 15

100% juice 125 ml (1/2 cup)

Choosing Vegetables and Fruit

  • Does juice count as a Food Guide Serving?

  • Look for the word 'juice' on the label

  • Choose whole fruit instead of juice most often

Slide # 15 - Speaker's Notes

  • ½ cup of juice is one Food Guide Serving.

  • If a beverage is called 'juice', it will not contain added sugar. Other beverages which include words such as punch, cocktail, or drink have sugar added to them and do not have the same nutrient value as 100% juice.

  • Fruit flavoured drinks also do not have the same nutrient value as 100% juice.

  • Canada's Food Guide recommends that people choose vegetables and fruit more often than juice to get more dietary fibre.

Slide # 16

Traditional foods in the Vegetables and Fruit group

  • Squash (whole and canned)
  • Corn (frozen)
  • Fiddleheads and wild greens
  • Berries (on the branch or frozen)

Vegetables and fruit

Vegetables and fruit

Slide # 16 - Speaker's Notes

  • Some of the foods that were traditionally eaten can now be found in stores in fresh, frozen or canned forms. Frozen and canned vegetables and fruit are healthy choices.

  • When buying canned fruits choose versions that are canned in fruit juice, or light syrup instead of heavy syrup. The heavy syrup has a lot of added sugar.

  • When buying canned vegetables and soups look for 'low salt' or 'reduced sodium' versions to lower your sodium intake.

Slide # 17

Choosing Grain Products

  • Make at least half your grain products whole grain each day
    • for fibre and magnesium intake
    • to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease

  • Bannock and wild rice are traditional foods in this food group
Bannock 35 g (2" x 2" x 1") Cooked rice - White, brown, wild 125 ml (1/2 c.)

Slide # 17 - Speaker's Notes

  • The food guide recommends that at least half your grain products are whole grain. Examples of whole grains are barley, brown rice, oats, whole wheat and wild rice.
  • Whole grains are recommended to help people get enough fibre and magnesium.
    A diet rich in whole grains may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (heart and stroke).

Why is bannock shown on this food guide?

  • Bannock is an important food for many First Nations, Inuit and Métis across Canada. It is important to note that one Food Guide Serving of bannock is about 35 g or a 2'x 2'x1' piece. This is equivalent to other items in the Grain Products food group such as a slice of bread or ½ cup wild rice.

  • Bannock can be made healthier by replacing some of the white flour with whole wheat flour or rolled oats (whole grains) and by baking it rather than frying it.

Slide # 18

Choosing Milk and Alternatives

  • Have 500 ml (2 cups) of lower fat milk every day
    • includes powdered and UHT milk
    • for calcium and vitamin D intake

  • Drink fortified soy beverages if you do not drink milk

Slide # 18 - Speaker's Notes

  • The food group name emphasizes the importance of milk in the diet and highlights alternatives such as fortified soy beverages, yogurt, cheese. Fortified soy beverages contain added nutrients that make them good alternatives to milk.

  • Two cups of milk are recommended each day for adequate vitamin D. Choosing lower fat milk each day is an effective way of getting calcium and vitamin D. Examples of lower fat milk are skim, 1%, and 2% M.F.

  • 'UHT milk' is a special kind of milk that has been processed at an 'Ultra High Temperature' to kill harmful bacteria and spores. This helps to prevent the milk from spoiling so that it lasts longer on the shelf. UHT milk should be refrigerated after it is opened just like fresh milk. UHT milk tastes different from fresh milk (a slightly cooked taste) because of this high temperature processing.

  • Examples of the traditional food sources of nutrients found in milk are shown on the last page of the food guide.

Slide # 19

Other dairy products...

  • Yogurt and cheese are good sources of calcium, but may not be good sources of vitamin D
Yogurt 175 g (3/4 cup) and Cheese 50 g (1 1/2 oz.)

Slide # 19 - Speaker's Notes

  • Yogurt and cheese are made from milk and are good sources of calcium.

  • However, yogurt and cheese may not be good sources of Vitamin D.

  • To get enough vitamin D it is important to drink 2 cups of milk, preferably low fat milk, or fortified soy beverage.

  • Cheese and some yogurts will provide a high amount of fat, saturated fat and calories. The amount of fat is shown as a % M.F. on the label, where M.F. stands for Milk Fat. The higher the % M.F., the more fat.

  • Using lower fat yogurt and lower fat cheese instead of full fat yogurt and cheese can help to reduce calories and saturated fat intake. Lower fat yogurt has 2% M.F. or less, and lower fat cheese has 15% to 20% M.F. or less.

  • People should note that most lower fat cheeses still contain a significant amount of saturated fat.

Slide # 20

Traditional food sources of the nutrients found in milk

  • In the past, First Nations, Inuit and Métis people got the important nutrients found in milk from traditional foods, including the foods shown on the right

  • People who don't drink milk products should get advice from a health care provider
Traditional foods - dairy

Slide # 20 - Speaker's Notes

  • This food guide shows that First Nations, Inuit and Métis people traditionally got the nutrients found in milk from other food sources such as wild plants, seaweed, fish with bones, shellfish, nuts, beans, and bannock when made with baking powder.

  • Since traditional foods are not eaten as much now as in the past, people may not get enough of these nutrients if they don't drink milk or fortified soy beverages. Today, even in places where people eat traditional food, store-bought food, including milk products, are consumed.

  • People who do not eat or drink milk products should get advice from a health care provider to ensure that they are getting enough nutrients.

  • The foods pictured are sources of key nutrients found in milk, such as protein, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin A, or magnesium.

  • Bannock is shown here because it is a source of calcium when made with baking powder. The calcium in bannock made with baking powder comes from the calcium phosphate in the baking powder.

Slide # 21

Choosing Meat and Alternatives

  • Choose lean meat and alternatives
    • many traditional meats are lean
    • prepare with little or no added fat or salt

  • Eat at least two Food Guide Servings of fish each week to reduce risk of heart disease and stroke

  • Have beans and lentils often
    • for a lower saturated fat intake
    • for fibre intake

Slide # 21 - Speaker's Notes

  • Lean store meats include lean hamburger, fish, turkey and chicken with the skin removed, as well as cuts of beef and pork with the visible fat removed. Limit high fat and salt meats like bacon, sausages, and canned meat.
  • Most wild meats like caribou, deer, and moose have less fat than store meats.
  • To prepare meats with little added fat choose low fat cooking techniques like stewing, broiling, braising, roasting, and barbequing.

Fish

  • Eating fish, especially fatty fish, is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke. Examples of fatty fish are char, herring, mackerel, salmon, sardines, trout.

Beans, lentils, tofu and other meat alternatives

  • Eating beans, lentils, and tofu instead of meat can lower your saturated fat intake as these foods are low in saturated fat.
  • Beans and lentils are sources of folate and dietary fibre.

Slide # 22

Traditional foods in the Meat and Alternatives group

  • Traditional meats and wild game
    • Beaver, caribou, rabbit, birds, moose, seal, and deer

  • Fish and shellfish
    • Crab, mussels, clams, fish (whole or canned)
Traditional meats and wild game 75 g cooked (2 1/2 oz)/125 ml (1/2 cup)
Fish and shellfish 75 g cooked (2 1/2 oz)/125 ml (1/2 cup)

Slide # 22 - Speaker's Notes

  • The traditional foods in the Meat and Alternatives food group include foods from the water, land and air. You will see beaver, caribou, rabbit, wild birds, moose, seal and deer, as well as crab, clams, mussels, and fish.

  • The benefits of eating traditional foods include:
    • traditional foods have less fat, salt and sugar than many store-bought foods
    • they have essential nutrients that are needed for good health
      during harvesting, people are being physically active
    • the spiritual and cultural importance of harvesting and eating traditional foods.

  • In some instances, governments advise people to limit certain foods when there is particular concern for a contaminant. These advisories are usually for pregnant and breastfeeding women and very young children. The food guide encourages consumers to ask about advisories for their communities or local area.

Slide # 23

When cooking or adding fat to food

  • Use vegetable oils with unsaturated (liquid) fat including canola, olive, and soybean oils

  • Aim for a small amount each day
Oil

Slide # 23 - Speaker's Notes

A small amount of fat is important for our health, but people often eat too much fat, and too much of the type of fat (saturated and trans saturated fat) that has been shown to be harmful to the health of the heart.

  • Instead of using saturated and trans fats, use vegetable oils with unsaturated fats. These include canola, olive and soybean oils.

  • Aim for a small amount (2 to 3 tablespoons or about 30-45mL) each day. This amount includes oil used for cooking, salad dressings, margarine and mayonnaise.

  • Traditional fats that are liquid at room temperature like seal and whale oil, or ooligan grease also contain unsaturated fats and can be used as all or part of the 2-3 Tbsp of unsaturated fats recommended per day.

  • Margarine is made from vegetable oils. If you buy margarine be sure to choose the soft margarines that are low in saturated and trans fats.

  • Limit the amount of butter, hard margarine, lard, shortening and bacon fat that you add to foods.

Slide # 24

Making better choices...

  • When choosing between packaged foods look in the Nutrition Facts table to compare the amounts of fat, sugar and sodium (salt)

  • Choose foods that are lower in fat, sugar and salt (sodium)

Slide # 24 - Speaker's Notes

The Nutrition Facts table on food labels can help you pick healthier food choices. You can use the Nutrition Facts table to compare foods.

Fats

  • The food guide recommends choosing foods that are lower in fat, and low in saturated and trans fats. Saturated and trans fats in foods increase the risk for developing heart disease.
  • Look for the amount of total fat, saturated fat, and trans fat on the Nutrition Facts table on packaged foods. The lower the number the less fat the food contains.

Sugar

  • The food guide recommends eating foods that are lower in sugar and to limit foods which contain a lot of sugar.
  • You can find the amount of sugars on the Nutrition Facts table on packaged foods. The lower the number, the less sugar the food contains.

Salt

  • The food guide recommends eating foods that are lower in salt, and to limit foods which contain a lot of salt.
  • Look for the amount of salt (sodium) on the Nutrition Facts table on packaged foods by looking at the amount of sodium.

Slide # 25

Respect your body

  • Limit foods and drinks which contain a lot of calories, fat, sugar or salt such as:
    • sweetened drinks
    • candies, pastries, donuts etc.
    • chips, nachos, fries, etc.
    • ice cream, chocolates, etc.
    • alcohol

  • This will lead to better health and help to maintain a healthy body weight

Slide # 25 - Speaker's Notes

  • Some foods should be limited because they are high in calories, fat, sugar or salt and can contribute to obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure.

  • Following Canada's Food Guide and limiting foods and drinks which contain a lot of calories, fat, sugar or salt are important ways to respect your body, and to lead to better health and a healthy body weight.

Examples of foods and drinks to limit are:

  • pop, fruit flavoured drinks, sweet drinks made from crystals, and sports and energy drinks
  • candy and chocolate
  • cakes, pastries, and doughnuts
  • muffins (that are high in fat and sugar)
  • granola bars and cookies
  • ice cream and frozen desserts
  • potato chips, nachos and other salty snacks
  • french fries and other deep fried foods
  • alcohol.

Slide # 26

Women of Childbearing Age

  • All women who could become pregnant and those who are pregnant or breastfeeding need a multivitamin containing folic acid every day

  • Pregnant women need to ensure that their multivitamin also contains iron

Slide # 26 - Speaker's Notes

  • All women who could become pregnant should take one daily multivitamin containing 400 micrograms (400 µg) of folic acid, starting at least three months before becoming pregnant. This lowers the risk of the baby developing neural tube defects (NTDs).

  • It is recommended that women continue taking a daily multivitamin containing folic acid during pregnancy and when breastfeeding to help meet their increased needs for nutrients.

  • It is difficult to meet the need for folate, and possibly other nutrients, through food alone, during pregnancy and while breastfeeding.

  • Each woman should ask her health care provider about the multivitamin that is right for her.

Slide # 27

Extra calories during...

  • The 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy

  • While breastfeeding

  • Adding a total of 2 or 3 extra Food Guide Servings (from any of the food groups) to your daily food intake should meet these extra calorie needs

Slide # 27 - Speaker's Notes

Women need a few more calories (food energy) when pregnant and breastfeeding. They should include an extra 2 to 3 Food Guide Servings from any of the food groups each day.

For example:

  • have dry meat or fish and a small piece of bannock for a snack, or
  • have an extra slice of toast at breakfast and an extra piece of cheese at lunch, or
  • have fruit and yogurt for a snack.

Extra calories are needed during pregnancy and breastfeeding:

  • Additional calories are not recommended for the first trimester of pregnancy since women typically do not require additional energy during the first three months of pregnancy.

Women in their second and third trimesters of pregnancy need more calories:

  • About 350 extra calories are needed in the second trimester
  • About 450 extra calories are needed in the third trimester.

While Breastfeeding:

  • Generally, women need about 350 to 400 extra calories per day for the first year of breastfeeding. The number of additional calories needed during breastfeeding depends on how much milk a woman makes, and her rate of weight loss.

Slide # 28

Slide # 28 - Speaker's Notes

  • As we get older our bodies change. After the age of 50 the skin isn't able to produce as much Vitamin D (from sun exposure) as it did when we were younger.

  • The recommendation for vitamin D needed over the age of 50 is higher than most people can get by only eating food. For example, people 51-70 years would need to drink 4 cups of milk per day, and people over 70 would need to drink 6 cups of milk per day to meet the vitamin D recommendation.

  • For this reason, it is recommended that all people over age 50 take a vitamin D supplement containing 400 IU of vitamin D in addition to following Canada's Food Guide.

  • In older adults, getting enough vitamin D may have the following health benefits:
    • increased bone mineral density
    • better muscle strength
    • reduced fracture rates
    • reduced rates of falling
    • better mobility.

Slide # 29

Being active every day

  • There are many ways to be active:
    • walking
    • group sports
    • snowshoeing

  • Are you active enough to stay healthy?
    • At least 2 ½ hours each week for adults
    • At least 60 minutes (1 hour) each day for children and youth
For strong body, mind and spirit, be active every day.

Slide # 29 - Speaker's Notes

  • Physical Activity Guidelines recommend at least 2 ½ hours of moderate to vigorous physical activity every week for adults.

  • Children and youth should aim for at least 60 minutes (1 hour) of activity per day.

  • The good news is that you don't have to do all your physical activity at once. You can add up periods of at least 10 minutes of activity throughout the day.  Choose a variety of activities, spread throughout the week.

  • An example of adding up 60 minutes of activity throughout the day is:
    • Go for a brisk 10 minute walk after lunch or supper
    • Play hockey, soccer, or basketball with the kids for 30 minutes
    • 10 minutes of shovelling snow, or raking the yard
    • Dance for 10 minutes in the living room to your favourite songs.

  • Try adding up the activity in your day. Are you active enough to stay healthy?

Slide # 30

For more information

Visit Canada's Food Guide online:
www.healthcanada.gc.ca/foodguide

You will find:

  • More information about eating well
  • Interactive tools on using Canada's Food Guide
  • How to order a copy of the food guide

Slide # 30 - Speaker's Notes

That brings us to the end of our walking tour through Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

If you would like to find out more information about eating well, develop a personalized one-page food guide, or order copies of this food guide you can do so on the Health Canada Food Guide website.

Thank you. Any questions?