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Food and Nutrition

Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis

Moose stew? Char? Blueberries? Bannock? For the first time, a national food guide has been created which reflects the values, traditions and food choices of First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

This new tailored food guide includes both traditional foods and store-bought foods that are generally available, affordable and accessible across Canada and provides unique images and content.

Recommendations are based on the new 2007 version of Canada's Food Guide.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is "Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis"?
  2. Why is there a food guide tailored to the needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis?
  3. What are the main differences between Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide and Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis?
  4. Does Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations Inuit and Métis replace other food guides that have been tailored regionally to reflect local foods and traditions?
  5. How were the languages for translation chosen, and where do the speakers of these languages live?

1. What is "Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis"?

It is a food guide tailored to reflect traditions and food choices of First Nations, Inuit and Métis, and is a complement to the 2007 Canada's Food Guide. This tailored food guide has recommendations for healthy eating based on science. It recognizes the importance of traditional and store-bought foods for First Nations, Inuit and Métis today.

This food guide can be an important tool for individuals, families and communities to learn about and share ways of eating well, including traditional and store-bought foods.

2. Why is there a food guide tailored to the needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis?

Aboriginal cultures have different values, traditions and sometimes different food choices from those of the general Canadian population. The tailored food guide shows examples of traditional foods of First Nations, Inuit and Métis. It also explains how traditional foods can be used in combination with store-bought foods for a healthy eating pattern.

3. What are the main differences between Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide and Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis?

Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis reflects the importance of both traditional and store-bought foods for Aboriginal people living in Canada.

It shows pictures of store-bought foods that are generally available in rural and remote locations, and provides unique images and content developed for Aboriginal populations.

4. Does Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations Inuit and Métis replace other food guides that have been tailored regionally to reflect local foods and traditions?

Previous versions of the Canada's Food Guide have been tailored in various regions across Canada to reflect local foods and traditions. However, this is the first time that Canada's Food Guide has been tailored nationally to reflect First Nations, Inuit and Métis foods and traditions.

The dietary information in this new nationally tailored food guide provides an up-to-date reference for adapting any local or regional food guides.

5. How were the languages for translation chosen, and where do the speakers of these languages live?

The Cree, Ojibwe and Inuktitut languages were chosen to reach the highest number of speakers. These languages all have more than 30,000 speakers each. All other Aboriginal languages have fewer than 15,000 speakers each. Data from the 2006 Census was used in making the decision about languages.

The Plains Cree language generally covers parts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The Woods Cree language generally covers parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The Ojibwe dialect selected covers parts of Saskatchewan, Manitoba and northwestern Ontario. The Inuktitut dialect selected is spoken by Inuit in the eastern Arctic.


If you have questions or comments on Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis, contact Health Community Programs Directorate.

See the Frequently Asked Questions on Canada's Food Guide for information links and information on Canada's Food Guide.